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 Phil Bourne

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Talk Title:
What Really Happens When We Take a Drug?

Date/Time:
Thursday, April 12th, 2011, 6:00 pm

Affiliation:
Professor, Department of Pharmacology and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego
Associate Director, RCSB Protein Data Bank and Adjunct Professor, Burnham Institute

URL:
Philip E. Bourne
The Bourne Lab

Abstract:
This is a question which, after generic clinical trials, is still very much answered by observing patient outcomes. Methods from bioinformatics and systems biology are making some inroads into answering this question more systematically through integration of a variety of data sources and important algorithmic developments. I will dig in to some of our work in this area, but if you cant wait refer to Xie et al. (2012) Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology 52: 361-379. I’ll also describe the importance of open science to this collective effort.

Please note:
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC

Recommended Readings
Ten Simple Rules

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Introductory Speaker:
Andrew McPherson, PhD candidate, Sahinalp lab, SFU and Huntsman lab, UBC

Title: Predicting the complex origins of chimeric transcripts using nFuse






 Nathan Price

Download Seminar Poster PDF

Presentation
Download PresentationPDF

Download Movie FLASH

Talk Title:
Integrated modeling of metabolic and regulatory networks

Date/Time:
Thursday, March 8th, 2011, 6:00 pm

Affiliation:
Associate Professor, Institute for Systems Biology, Seattle, WA

URL:
Nathan Price

Abstract:
To harness the power of genomics, it is essential to link genotype to phenotype through the construction of quantitative systems models. I will discuss approaches for the creation of such quantitative models that can simulate a variety of cellular functions. I will focus particularly on automated methods for integrating metabolic and regulatory networks such as our newly developed approach, Probabilistic Regulation of Metabolism (PROM) (Chandrasekaran and Price, PNAS, 2010). PROM is notable in that it represents the successful integration of a top-down reconstructed, statistically inferred regulatory network with a bottom-up reconstructed, biochemically detailed metabolic network, bridging two important classes of systems biology models that are rarely combined quantitatively. Additionally, I will discuss our new strategy to curate the inference of regulatory interactions from high throughput data using metabolic networks—providing multiple layers of biological context to the problem of regulation. Finally, I will describe our approach to building tissue and cell type specific metabolic models, which we have now done for 131 different cell types and tissues in the human body.

Please note:
Trainees are invited to meet with the VanBUG speaker for open discussion of both science and career paths. This takes place 4:30-5:30pm in either the Boardroom or Lunchroom on the ground floor of the BCCRC

Recommended Readings
Modeling of genome-scale metabolic and regulatory networks

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Introductory Speaker:
Evan Morien, MSc candidate, Pavlidis lab, CHiBi, UBC

Title: Genomic Expression Patterns in WIld Pacific Salmon